Ann Hirsch and Jeremy Angier of A+J Art+Design are honored to have been selected to create a public art project in Boston’s oldest public square, North Square.Their concept was selected through a highly competitive open call for artists.

The team will work with the Boston Public Works Department (PWD), the Boston Art Commission, and the North End community to further develop their initial proposal. The public art project will be implemented in conjunction with an overall reconstruction project in North Square. The project will be installed in 2018.

This temporary exhibition in Boston’s Fort Point Channel called attention to today’s refugee crisis. Each figure represented nearly 1 million of the United Nations’ estimated 21.3 million refugees in the world today, as we previously reported.

The “scale of refugees to figures floating in the water is heartbreaking,” Madhumita Narayan wrote. “The realistic sculptures really made it feel like a more tangible cause, rather than just a statistic.”

 

“Onlookers at Fort Point stop to admire and make sense of the eye-catching figures. The uniform shapes are painted “safety orange” for good reason. From an artistic standpoint, it was important for the artists to choose a bright color they knew would make a big impression on observers.

On a deeper level, the color “safety orange” is a color that signifies the idea of hazards, danger and safety. Life vests and safety rafts are usually this brash, orange color which set them apart from their surroundings. The alarming orange color evokes a sense of urgency common to the journey of those seeking asylum.”

Collaborating with Jeremy Angier as A+J Art+Design, SOS (Safety Orange Swimmers) was unveiled for installation from Oct. – Dec. 2016 in Fort Point Channel, Boston, MA! Check out the story on CNN.

Mayor Marty Walsh announced in a statement earlier this week that 10 locals have been chosen for the nine-month residency supported by Boston AIR. The artists will help develop ways to improve Boston by promoting the presence of art and culture in everyday life.

“Arts and culture form the building blocks that make our city thrive,” Walsh said in the statement. “They encourage us to engage with each other and connect to the larger community.”